Local Media Tips for Racers

Congratulations, you will be competing in the biggest motocross race in the Canada – the Parts Canada TransCan Grand National Championship. Now it’s time to spread the word on your accomplishment. What you do is really cool, and most local newspapers would jump at the chance to cover your story if they knew about it.

Want to see your name in the local paper? Help your sponsors? Impress your girl/boyfriend, wife, husband or kids? Then follow the simple directions below for creating your own press release and getting it published in your home newspaper. It’s a fill-in-the-blank form that anyone can use. Just make sure to use spell-check before you send it out!

HOW TO USE THE PRESS RELEASE

The attached press release (click here to download or see below to cut and paste) helps you build a ready-made story for your local paper. Any reporter will be able to use this with minimal effort, and reporters like it when you do the hard work for them! Use the tips below to increase your chances of getting the story published.

Download the attached press release and fill in the blanks with your information – your name, hometown, age, sponsors, etc. Find something unique and interesting about yourself that may be of interest to your local community. Feel free to add additional content or paragraphs – the more info about yourself the better. The more info on the local racer (you) the better.

When you submit your release, use a proper opener and closer in your email, such as “Dear (such and such)” and “Sincerely.”

Include your contact information (phone number and email) in case the reporter needs to follow up for additional information. Often a reporter will call our office looking for information on a racer. You’re the best source of info on yourself, so make it clear how they can get in touch with you.

Finally, make sure to proof read your work and use spell-check before you send it out. Or if you prefer, you can forward it to us and we can give it a once-over for you as a double check. Send it to admin@motocrosscanada.ca

TOP TIPS TO HELP GET YOUR STORY PUBLISHED

Contact the newspaper ahead of time, ask for the Sports Desk (best to call after 2 p.m.), introduce yourself and politely ask, “Which person on your staff handles the local motorsports stories?” Note: If you have access to the Internet there’s a chance you can find out this information without calling. However, it’s best to call in order to establish a relationship with these people, as you’ll be calling back to follow up on your story several times.

Be prepared to send two pictures of yourself – one action shot of you riding your bike (your very, very best, clearest picture), and one current headshot of yourself (a school picture will work fine). If possible, you should have these pictures scanned at a high resolution so you can email them to your local newspaper’s sports department. Kinko’s can scan pictures and put them on a CD if you do not have access to a scanner. If you have to, have prints made and hand deliver them to the newspaper (you can do this with your CD as well). Call ahead of time and make sure the reporter you’re working with is going to be there. This will give you a chance to introduce yourself in person to the reporter that’s doing your story. If the paper wants one of their photographers to take pictures of you for the story, MAKE SURE you adjust your schedule to fit theirs!

Chances are sports reporters don’t know a lot about motorcycles or motocross. Ask the reporter if he/she has ever ridden a dirt bike or a street bike. If they say “Oh, a long time ago” ask them if they remember how much fun it was. Let them share their experience with you. This is a quick and easy way to get personable with one other. Chances are they’ll remember how fun it was and this will help them relate better to what you’re doing and how big of a deal it is for you to race in the most important amateur motocross race in Canada.

Local media cover lots of stories on ‘provincial champion’ athletes from high school sports like football, basketball, wrestling, gymnastics, etc. Remember, you’re competing for a national championship, and you’re one of the best in your age group/skill level. Make sure the reporter knows how tough of a sport motocross is, how hard you’ve practiced to get to this point, and the sacrifices your family has made in order for you to make it this far. Also, let the reporter know that while you like to play baseball, basketball, football, hockey (or whatever other sport), you chose to compete in motocross because… (tell the reporter your feelings on this).

Use this as a learning experience. It won’t be easy. You might fumble on your words, forget stuff and have to reach back out to the reporter, or draw a blank when you go to talk, but don’t worry! It’s up to the reporter to ask questions to get you talking. Don’t be shy. Act like you’re sitting on your bike talking to your best buddy at your favorite track. Don’t give “Yes” and “No” answers. Explain yourself. Make that reporter think when he hangs up, “Man, that kid sure is cool!”

So that’s it! Go sell yourself and be proud of your accomplishment. Your family, friends, fans and sponsors will love you for it! Email us the published article admin@motocrosscanada or bring a copy with you to the races and we will post it on our social media just to show everyone how cool you are.


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Local Racer Earns Spot at Canadian Motocross Championship from Walton Raceway

Walton, Ont. – (Hometown)’s (First and Last Name) just made his/her dream come true. The XX-year-old dirt bike racer has qualified for the largest amateur motocross race in Canada, the 25th Annual Parts Canada TransCan Canadian Motocross Grand National Championship at Walton Raceway. (Last Name) has earned one of just 42 qualifying positions in (his/her) class and age group.

“The Parts Canada TransCan Grand National Championship at Walton Raceway is the event every motocross racer in the Canada aims to compete in,” said Event Director Mark Perrin. “A win at the TransCan Amateur Grand National Championship gives a rider instant National notoriety and can serve as a springboard to a lucrative professional motocross career.”

Most of Canada’s top professional motocross racers, including 2014 Canadian Motocross Champion’s Colton Facciotti and Kaven Benoit, have won Parts Canada TransCan Canadian Motocross Grand National Amateur Championships at Walton Raceway at some point before becoming professional. It will also feature top Americans Davi Milsaps and Mike Alessi. The race is so prestigious that for the second time in Canadian Motocross the Final Amateur day of racing, Saturday, August 21st and TransCan Pro Open on Sunday August 21. 2016 will be streamed LIVE online. The both will also feature TSN coverage on later dates.

With the help of sponsors such as (List Major Sponsors) who help pay his/her way to the races, (Last Name) has had the opportunity to pursue this life long dream. He/She has won XX races in the last XX years and competes nearly every weekend at (Local Track and its Location).

(Last Name) will make the journey to Walton Raceway along with his/her (List Relatives/Friends). The amateur races run Wednesday, August 17 – Saturday, August 20, with the final TransCan $30,000.00 Pro Open happening Sunday, August 21, 2016.

(Last Name) is just one of the hundreds of racers from coast to coast that spent the last three months qualifying for the TransCan. The top finishers in regional qualifiers earn a berth into the Parts Canada TransCan Grand National Championship race at Walton Raceway. Racers may enter a wide variety of classes, from 50cc Pewee classes for children as young as 4 years old, all the way up to a Plus 40 and Vet division for riders over 40 and 50 years old. There is also a class for women and classes for all bike sizes up to 450cc.

The track is built in what is known to most as “Motocross Town” in the quiet village of Walton, Ontario. The racing track contains a variety of jumps, corners and other obstacles designed to test the skills and stamina of the racers, as they can fly up to 30 feet in the air and a distance of more than 100 feet.

Most riders attend the event with the help of their families. In fact, many groups consider the event their family’s summer vacation. Besides races, the Walton Facility features a campground, bicycle park, mountain bike trails, a high ropes challenge course and more. Walton Raceway provides a family-friendly facility with nightly activities for everyone, as well as Friday Night Concert, with Canadian Country Music up and coming star Cold Creek County and Jordan Mcintosh.

More Information About The TransCan
In 1992, the TransCan was created as Walton Raceway would hold an annual event drawing on all the best things in the sport, an annual coming together for bragging rights, a celebration of Canadian Motocross. The TransCan was built from a great natural track, strong community support, accessibility and support from the Industry. The emphasis was to be real outdoor style motocross, highly competitive with lots of extracurricular attractions and opportunity for the best Canadian racers in all age classes to compete against each other for a Canadian Amateur and Pro Motocross Championship.

More Information About Walton Raceway
Walton Raceway is located in Huron Country on Ontario West Coast. The address of the facility is 42852 Walton Road in Walton, Ontario, Canada. Walton Raceway was opened in 1971 and is one the longest running and most prestigious Motocross facilities within Canada.